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Mojave Desert Science Symposium 1999

 THE ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS OF INVASIVE EXOTIC SPECIES

Principal Investigator: Dr. Jeff Lovich

In 1958, Charles Elton stated "we are living in a period of the world's history when the mingling of thousands of kinds of organisms from different parts of the world is setting up terrific dislocations in nature..." Modern ecologists are now well aware of the problems caused by the invasion of exotic species into natural areas and the associated negative effects on global patterns of native biodiversity. Once established, some exotic species have the ability to displace or replace native plant and animal species, disrupt nutrient and fire cycles, and cause changes in the pattern of plant succession. Studies are underway to better understand the impacts of these species on native ecosystems.

Jeff was a long time member of the Board of Directors of the California Exotic Pest Plant Council and senior editor of their symposium proceedings series. He has published several papers on invasive species and their impacts on biodiversity.

Salt Cedar flowers or tamarisk.

The beautiful flowers of saltcedar or tamarisk (Tamarix ramosissima) signal the decline of native riparian plant species in the southwestern United States. Saltcedar's spread has been facilitated by large-scale changes in river systems because of dams, and irrigation projects. However, several physiological traits make saltcedar a vigorous invader, even in areas undisturbed by human activities.

 

 

PRODUCTS

DeLoach, C.J., R.I. Carruthers, J.E. Lovich, T.L. Dudley, and S.D. Smith. 2000. Ecological interactions in the biological control of saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) in the United States: toward a new understanding. In, pp. 819-873, N. R. Spencer (ed.), Proceedings of the X International Symposium on Biological Control of Weeds. 4-14 July, 1999, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana.

Lovich, J.E. 2000. Pennisetum setaceum Forsskal. Invasive plants of California’s wildlands. In, pp. 258-262, C.C. Bossard, J.M. Randall, and M.C. Hoshovsky (eds.). University of California Press, Berkeley.

Lovich, J.E. 2000. Tamarix ramosissima Lebed, Tamarix chinensis, Tamarix gallica, Tamarix parviflora. Invasive plants of California’s wildlands. In, pp. 312-317, C.C. Bossard, J.M. Randall, and M.C. Hoshovsky (eds.). University of California Press, Berkeley.

Lovich, J. E. and R. G. de Gouvenain. 1998. Saltcedar invasion in desert wetlands of the southwestern United States: ecological and political implications. In, pp. 447-467. S. K. Majumdar, E. W. Miller, and F. J. Brenner (eds.). Ecology of Wetlands and Associated Systems. Pennsylvania Academy of Science.

Lovich, J. E. 1998. Human-induced changes in the Mojave and Colorado Desert ecosystems: recovery and restoration potential. Status and Trends of the Nation's Biological Resources. In M. J. Mac, P. A. Opler, C. E. Puckett Haecker, P. D. Doran (eds.). Vol. 2. Pages 529-531. U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S.

Lovich, J. E. 1997. Wildlife as weeds. In, pp. 46-51, J. Lovich, J. Randall, and M. Kelly (eds.). Proceedings California Exotic Pest Plant Council Symposium '96.

Lovich, J. E. 1997. WEB PAGE. Saltcedar invasion in desert wetlands of the southwestern United States: ecological and political implications.

Lovich, J., J. Randall, and M. Kelly (eds.). 1997. Proceedings California Exotic Pest Plant Council Symposium '96. California Exotic Pest Plant Council. 110 pp.

Lovich, J. E., J. Randall, and M. Kelly (eds.). 1996. Proceedings California Exotic Pest Plant Council Symposium '95. California Exotic Pest Plant Council, 64 pp.

Lovich, J. E. 1996. A brief overview of the impact of tamarisk infestation on native plants and animals. In pp. 13-15. J. DiTomaso and C. E. Bell (eds.), Proceedings of the Saltcedar Management Workshop, Rancho Mirage, California, June 12, 1996.

Bell, C. E. et al., including J. E. Lovich. 1996. Saltcedar: a non-native invasive plant in the western U.S. Color brochure produced by the University of California Cooperative Extension. Copies available by contacting Carl Bell at (760)352-9474.

Lovich, J. E. 1996 WEB PAGE. A brief review of the impacts of tamarisk, or saltcedar, on biodiversity in the New World.

Lovich, J. E. 1995. Wildlife and weeds: life in an alien landscape. CalEPPC News (California Exotic Pest Plant Council newsletter) 3:4-5.

Lovich, J. E., T. B. Egan, and R. C. de Gouvenain. 1994. Tamarisk control on public lands in the desert of southern California: two case studies. 46th Annual California Weed Conference, California Weed Science Society. pp. 166-177.


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