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TRACKING THE TRACKED: A GLOBAL REVIEW OF THE EVOULTION OF TECHNOLOGICAL MEASURES USED TO DESCRIBE SEABIRD BEHAVIORS AT SEA

Released: 2015
Citation:
Arimitsu, H, H Robinson,  EC Kelsey, DM Pereksta, J Adams. 2015. TRACKING THE TRACKED: A GLOBAL REVIEW OF THE EVOULTION OF TECHNOLOGICAL MEASURES USED TO DESCRIBE SEABIRD BEHAVIORS AT SEA. Pacific Seabird Group, 42nd Annual Meeting, 18-21 February 2015, San Jose, CA. [Poster Presentation]

 

To better understand seabird movement behavior, we analyzed peer-reviewed literature on seabird biology using ISI Web of Science and available literature cited in relevant journal articles. Our analysis revealed the development of various methods used for studying individual seabirds at sea and applied to numerous populations worldwide. We complied biological results from >367 peer-reviewed studies into a singular database and tabulated information pertaining to seabird species, study locations, data types provided, and methods employed. Whereas land or ship based observations have been ubiquitous, such platform-based observations are limited by their inability to define individual-specific metrics (e.g., foraging range) or to measure complex seabird behaviors (e.g., time at depth). With the evolution of technologically sophisticated tracking devices, including VHF radio transmitters, satellite tags, geolocation sensors, and GPS loggers, complicated movement behaviors and the influence of environmental conditions can now be measured in great detail providing a more comprehensive understanding of oceanographic area utilization, flight and foraging patterns, and environmental interactions. We found most studies focused on foraging behavior (62%, n=228) and diving ability (40%, n=174). Excluding penguins, 211 seabird species from 17 families have been studied, with the largest species tending to be the most studied. Meta-analyses of the complied data will provide better understanding of regional and taxonomic variability in at sea behaviors, and allow for better evaluations of risks, vulnerabilities, and habitat requirements for seabirds at sea.

 

 



This product is associated with the following project:
Summary of Seabird Studies at WERC

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